Bill would take away local control of agritourism

By on Feb 15, 2017 in Stories | 0 comments

Less than a year after legislators approved a bill defining how municipal bodies should treat agritourism, the New Hampshire Senate is considering another bill that would completely remove local regulation on the issue. During a Senate Public and Municipal Affairs Committee hearing, the bill’s primary sponsor, Sen. Bob Giuda, argued that the law passed in 2016 didn’t go far enough to protect the commercial interests of farmers. “We are allowing our local communities … to define commerce in our state,” he said. “That is not a power we give to our towns and communities.” Giuda said his proposed amendments to the law were necessary in light of several ongoing lawsuits that pit farmers who want to diversify and host weddings to stay in business against their neighbors who want peace and quiet on the weekend. “The law is being used against individuals by other individuals because we...

The Oldest Profession might not be what you think

By on Feb 11, 2017 in Carole's Corner | 0 comments

“I want to see the Guinea Pig,” asked Mason. “No, Mason, it’s a Mini Pig, not a Guinea Pig,” explained his mother. Mason, a five-year-old boy and his parents, were spending the night at our Farm House Inn and wanted to snuggle with Tazzy, our mini porch pig. Miles Smith Farm is a working pig and cattle farm and most of our income comes from selling meat. No matter how hard we work our sales don’t quite cover farm operations. With a $30,000 yearly hay bill, $12,000 yearly electric bill plus taxes, mortgage, heat and more we often wonder how we can pay our bills. How do we manage? We brought back a tradition that is just as old as farming: Agritourism. Many think that Agritourism is a new thing; it’s not. “Agritourism has been part of the fabric of agriculture in New Hampshire for generations. If anything, the increase in attention of late is a revival,” according to...

Dairy farmers closer to receiving drought aid

By on Feb 10, 2017 in Stories | 1 comment

From “cow committee” to the New Hampshire Senate floor, dairy farmers inch ever closer to receiving funds to help make up for last summer’s drought. In a 19-3 floor vote Thursday, state senators moved forward a bill that would provide $2 million to the Milk Producers Emergency Relief Fund board to then be distributed to the state’s dairy farmers. The board recommended that the Legislature appropriate a $3.6 million one-time payment for dairy farmers back in October. This was in response to the 2016 drought and associated feed losses, which were compounded by two years of low milk prices set by the federal government. Over the course of 2016, the number of licensed cow dairy operations in New Hampshire dropped from 123 to 115, according to state data. The Dairy Farmers Task Force took up the issue this past fall, a group that Senate majority leader Jeb Bradley said was fondly referred...

What do Cattle, Pigs and Kitchen Scraps have in Common?

By on Jan 30, 2017 in Carole's Corner | 0 comments

Charlotte knocked the tub out of my hands and coleslaw tumbled to the ground. She was clearly excited about the kitchen scraps I was feeding, so excited she acted like a pig. Charlotte is actually a seven hundred pound friendly sow who smells like maple syrup. She has lived at Miles Smith Farm ever since she dodged being turned into bacon three years ago. Pigs are omnivores and need protein to survive and thrive. We feed our young piglets a grain mix but we feed the older sows (female pigs) and our boar (male pig) a variety of food. Since these older pigs are not growing much they can eat different types of food including kitchen scraps. Kitchen scraps are created when chefs prepare meals and can include kale, lettuce stems, fruit, assorted vegetables, cake, pasta and bread but never meat. Kitchen waste is a huge problem for chefs and in most cases goes into a dumpster and then to the...

Keeping up with changes: Loudon farm does first boil thanks to early, big sap run

By on Jan 27, 2017 in Stories | 0 comments

The Moore family may not be big on the term “climate change.” But the Loudon farmers have seen changes in the maple season, invasive species and forest regeneration over time. And they’re learning everything they can to adapt. This year, for instance, has brought an extended January thaw. And while it’s normal for a day or two to be significantly warmer than usual this time of year, temperatures that sometimes touch 50 degrees for a week and a half is unusual. “It’s not just a little sap run,” 28-year-old Jeff Moore said. In response, Jeff, his 26-year-old brother, Brad, and their father, Larry, all bustled around the Windswept Maples Farm sugar shack Thursday to get their evaporator up and running. They boiled about 6,000 gallons of sap collected over the previous week in a network of taps, tubing and holding containers. By the wee hours of Friday morning, they had 125 gallons of...

How organic farming is growing, if slowly, in New Hampshire

By on Jan 27, 2017 in Stories | 0 comments

Generally speaking, New Hampshire is a little behind the curve when it comes to organic farming. Compared with Vermont and Maine, Granite State organic growers are fewer and farther between. The U.S. Department of Agriculture Organic Integrity Database shows 147 operations in New Hampshire have been certified since 2002, when national certification began. Vermont, a state with less than half the population of New Hampshire, boasts 724 certified organic farms. Maine, which is more comparable to New Hampshire in population but larger in size, has 545 certified organic farms. Northeast Organic Farming Association of New Hampshire (NOFA-NH) staffer Monica Rico said that’s changing, albeit slowly. “I think we have a growing movement with organic farming in New Hampshire,” she said. The data would seem to support that: There’s been a spike in certifications the past two years, on top of...

$2 million proposed in funding for dairy relief bill

By on Jan 25, 2017 in Stories | 1 comment

Dairy farmers are officially on the 2017 legislative docket. Senate Majority Leader Jeb Bradley presented a relief funding bill to the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee on Tuesday. “It’s hard to imagine drought after all the moisture we’ve had over the last couple months,” Bradley said. But he added that after a lack of rain, a shortage in forage crops and a second year of dropping milk prices, “dairy farmers and their herds were totally adversely affected.” State dairy licensing and permitting data show that for more than 10 months in 2016, New Hampshire’s 123 farms shipping milk were reduced to 115. On Tuesday, Bradley brought with him an amendment to the bill, proposing to simplify the process and appropriate $2 million to be divided among licensed milk producers. The original version of the bill, written in large part by Weare Republican and Dairy Farmers Task Force...

Dances with Weather, Winter Weather

By on Jan 22, 2017 in Carole's Corner | 2 comments

It was going to be a cold night so Bruce and I had to work fast. Temperatures had been in the 40s and 50s for a few days and all the manure and water that was previously frozen had thawed to sea of six-inch muck. If we waited the muck would freeze solid, impossible to clear away. Winter farming is a dance with weather that changes from day to day. Freezing temperatures turn boot-sucking mud into a solid surface; slippery and hard to walk on. A mini heat wave in winter can turn frozen surfaces into muck especially where there is manure.  As soon as it turns warm the manure melts. Cattle standing in the muck makes it worse.  We call these problem spots, “loafing areas.” Clean loafing areas are important to cattle health. If cattle lie down in the muck they’ll get wet and cold. Besides animal health, there is another reason to keep cattle areas clean; food for human...